Assets That Do Not Count Toward The SNAP Asset Limit

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  • The house you live in and the land around it.
  • Real property like land or buildings (besides your home) that you own but are making a good faith effort to sell.
  • One vehicle (Click here to learn more about other vehicles that may be excluded from the asset limit and Click here for information on how the value of additional vehicles is determined).  
  • Household goods such as furniture, appliances, and gift cards.
  • Personal effects - such as clothing and jewelry.
  • Life insurance.
  • Up to $10,000 received as a lump sum and deposited within 30 days in a special account approved by DHHS to be used for:
    • Expenses for education or job training to attend an accredited or approved postsecondary education or training institution;
    • The purchase or repair of a vehicle used for transportation to work or to attend an education or training program;
    • Capital to start a small business for any family member 18 years of age or older;
    • Placement in a family development account authorized by state law, to the extent that the total balance of such an account remains below $10,000;
    • Health care costs of a household member that are medically necessary and that are not covered by public or private insurance;
    • an emergency that may cause the loss of shelter, employment or other basic necessities; or
    • other essential family needs approved by the department.
  • Pension funds and tax-deferred retirement accounts including but not limited to Keogh Plans and simplified employer pension plans (SEP).
  • assets with cash value not accessible to the household such as  property in probate, or property which is inaccessible due to other legal action
  • real property which the household is making a good faith effort to sell at a reasonable price
  • certain jointly held assets that cannot be subdivided and the joint owner will not agree to sell
  • irrevocable trusts
  • resources that cannot be sold or disposed of for a significant return.
  • prepaid funeral contracts, burial space, and the value of one bona fide funeral agreement per household member
  • life insurance
  • income producing real property - if the property is annually producing income consistent with its fair market value, even if only used on a seasonal basis
  • tools and equipment necessary for employment - even if the person is not currently employed, the tools and equipment need not be producing income consistent with the fair market value;
  • government payments - to restore a home damaged in a disaster,
  • assets which have been prorated as income such as  student income from grants and loans, self-employment income,  contract income;
  • livestock - used to produce income or intended for family consumption;
  • payments resulting from Congressional action which specifically exclude such payment (examples - the Maine Indian Land Claims Settlement; The Agent Orange Settlement Fund), certain payments to Indian Tribal members
  • reimbursement from Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policy Act of 1970;
  • payments received from JTPA;
  • payments from HEAP;
  • HUD retroactive tax and utility cost subsidy.
  • The assets of any household member who receives SSI or TANF or PaS are excluded when a household's total resources are calculated. This excludes certain assets in so-called mixed households.
  • Earned income tax credits as follows:
  • A federal earned income tax credit received by an individual or his or her spouse, either as a lump sum or as payments under section 3507 of the Internal Revenue Code for the month of receipt and the following month.
  • Any federal, state, or local earned income tax credit received by any household member shall be excluded for 12 months, provided the household was participating in the Food Supplement Program at the time they were received.  The earned income tax credit provided the household participates continuously during that 12-month period.
  • Breaks in participation of one month or less due to administrative reasons, such as delayed recertification, is not considered nonparticipation in determining the 12-month exclusion.
  • Matching awards of Savings Offer Success (SOS) made by Rural Opportunities, Inc. (ROI) to households that participate in their program are to be excluded as income and as a resource. The individual’s contribution is not excluded as a resource.
  • Funds in the Department of Housing and Urban Developments (HUD) Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS) escrow accounts.
  • Family Development Accounts or Separate Identifiable Accounts set up as authorized by state law 22 MRSA 3762 of up to the $10,000 cap and any accrued interest.
  • Federal Thrift Savings accounts as provided in Sec. 8439, Title 5, USC.
  • Education savings accounts established under Sec. 529 (qualified tuition program), and Sec. 530 (Coverdell education savings) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
  • Matching awards of Savings Offer Success (SOS) made by Rural Opportunities, Inc. (ROI) to households that participate in their program are to be excluded as income and as a resource. The individual’s contribution is not excluded as a resource.
  • Funds in the Department of Housing and Urban Developments (HUD) Family Self-Sufficiency Program (FSS) escrow accounts.
  • Family Development Accounts or Separate Identifiable Accounts set up as authorized by state law 22 MRSA 3762 of up to the $10,000 cap and any accrued interest.
  • Federal Thrift Savings accounts as provided in Sec. 8439, Title 5, USC.
  • Education savings accounts established under Sec. 529 (qualified tuition program), and Sec. 530 (Coverdell education savings) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.